Students in Dual Enrollment find college Government class challenging

Martin High School students wait for the start of a recent Government 2305 class. VMT sophomores are also taking this class for Dual Enrollment credit.

The Magnet Tribune: Kassandra Rico

Martin High School students wait for the start of a recent Government 2305 class. VMT sophomores are also taking this class for Dual Enrollment credit.

Students taking Government course 2035 have noticed a big difference from last year’s English course in dual enrollment. They say they face very different challenges with the new course as opposed to last year’s freshman English classes.

“There’s more pressure in the way that the professor expects you to read and do the work that we are expected to do,” said Vanessa Camacho, a student in dual enrollment whose fine arts is steel drums.

Some seniors, like Vanessa Camacho, aren’t a big fan of this course. Kassandra Rico doesn’t find it amusing. Other students like Tatiana Garcia only enjoy the experience of the college feel but dislike the course.

“Our professor usually assigns essays and tests upon the chapters we review,” Garcia said, whose fine art is high brass.

According to Camacho, “he presents the lesson in a PowerPoint and gives them real life examples.”

Camacho thought she wasn’t doing well in class.

“I want to believe I’m doing good, but I’m not too positive,” Camacho said.

But Garcia thought she was doing well.

One sees a “benefit” in taking the class.

“This course will benefit me in the future by allowing me to get ahead in my college credits,” Rico, whose fine arts is journalism, said.

Garcia agreed.

“I feel this class will improve my understanding of government, since I’m not the biggest fan of the subject.”

Camacho thinks it won’t help her because said she does not need this course for her major.

However, government is a requirement for degrees.

The students tell Matt Arambula, AP Economics instructor and Dual Enrollment supervisor, that the topics are interesting but sometimes the students feel the class is slow moving.

“This is the first actual college class where the students have to read chapters,” Arambula said.

Even though they are all passing, Arambula thinks this course is different because if the students don’t keep up with their reading they’ll fall behind.

Unlike most of the students Arambula likes this course.

“I love government; it’s what I majored in. What I like about it is that it’s always changing,” he said.

Arambula thinks that this course will help the students when they enroll in college next year.

“They’ll already have college credit in federal government, and it will give them an idea of what a ‘reading’ class is about,” he said.